Saturday, November 17, 2012

Progress Not Perfection – Admitting When I’m Wrong


Progress Not Perfection – Admitting When I’m Wrong

For the first 45 years of my existence I was never wrong. I couldn’t even say the word. It would be like admitting defeat. On a rare occasion I would admit to being less right than I originally thought, but never wrong.  My ego got in the way.  I thought I knew how to fix everything and everyone – particularly those closest to me. It was the hubris of a young woman in a dysfunctional relationship with an addict. If he would only listen to me, everything would be great.  But that hubris carried over into every aspect of my life, affected my relationships with friends and coworkers, and caused me to make some unfortunate decisions.

Fortunately, the tools I used to in my recovery from my association with the disease of alcoholism, which included Al- Anon, yoga, meditation and Doreen Virtue’s books, lead me on a path of self-discovery and personal growth that has caused me to reexamine my attitudes and make changes that led me to peace and serenity. One of the greatest gifts was being able to admit when I am wrong.  It has been liberating to be able to admit to another “I was wrong”. This gift has helped me with my marriage, relationships with friends and coworkers and my employer. Accepting responsibility for mistakes or errors in judgment is liberating.

But as with all things in life, this is a journey. There are ups and downs. As one who is opinionated on myriad issues and avidly shares those opinions, there are occasions when my exuberance and need to be right can interfere with courtesy.  And there are times when I still resist admitting when I am wrong. But the fact that I can admit it at all to anyone is growth.  Fortunately, I’ve learned that I cannot change my attitudes and behaviors overnight. It is a process. And as long as I continue to make progress on my path, I’m ok with it. And I am grateful for my friends, relatives, coworkers and acquaintances that can accept me as I am.

Namaste.



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